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FRENCH ARTISTS, ACTIVISTS AND PROTESTERS: Getting Started

FRENCH ART AND THE CULTURAL HERITAGE OF FRANCE

French Activists

French Counterculture in Pictures

DISCLAIMER

 ARTICLES, PICTURES AND INFORMATION FOUND ON THIS LIB-GUIDE HAVE BEEN GATHERED FROM VARIOUS SOURCES TO BE USED AS A "STARTING POINT" TO INSPIRE FURTHER RESEARCH.

SOME OF THE SITES USED ARE:

https://www.artsy.net

https://www.britannica.com

PLEASE REMEMBER ANY INFORMATION USED FROM THESE AND OTHER SITES MUST BE PROPERLY CITED

The filmmakers, artists and singers leading protest against police violence in France

The Art Of The Demonstration: What Americans Can Learn From The French

French and DADA art movement

The French avant-garde kept abreast of Dada activities in Zürich with regular communications from Tristan Tzara (whose pseudonym means "sad in country," a name chosen to protest the treatment of Jews in his native Romania), who exchanged letters, poems, and magazines with Guillaume ApollinaireAndré BretonMax JacobClément Pansaers, and other French writers, critics and artists.

Paris had arguably been the classical music capital of the world since the advent of musical Impressionism in the late 19th century. One of its practitioners, Erik Satie, collaborated with Picassoand Cocteau in a mad, scandalous ballet called Parade. First performed by the Ballets Russes in 1917, it succeeded in creating a scandal but in a different way than Stravinsky's Le Sacre du printemps had done almost five years earlier. This was a ballet that was clearly parodying itself, something traditional ballet patrons would obviously have serious issues with.

Dada in Paris surged in 1920 when many of the originators converged there. Inspired by Tzara, Paris Dada soon issued manifestos, organized demonstrations, staged performances and produced a number of journals (the final two editions of DadaLe Cannibale, and Littérature featured Dada in several editions.)[30]

The first introduction of Dada artwork to the Parisian public was at the Salon des Indépendants in 1921. Jean Crotti exhibited works associated with Dada including a work entitled, Explicatif bearing the word Tabu. In the same year Tzara staged his Dadaist play The Gas Heart to howls of derision from the audience. When it was re-staged in 1923 in a more professional production, the play provoked a theatre riot (initiated by André Breton) that heralded the split within the movement that was to produce Surrealism. Tzara's last attempt at a Dadaist drama was his "ironic tragedyHandkerchief of Clouds in 1924.

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